Independence Day Business Israeli army: ‘Albanian Independence Day is a day of terror’

Israeli army: ‘Albanian Independence Day is a day of terror’

On the day of independence in 1921, the Armenian-Israeli conflict was still a civil war.

And for many Israelis, it was a time of fear and uncertainty.

“Albania is the country of terror,” Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon said at the time.

“This day, for all Armenians, is a night of terror and humiliation.”

The day was marked by many acts of terror, with Armenians being forced to wear uniforms to prevent the spread of the virus, which had already claimed the lives of some 200,000 people.

A few months later, the Israeli government passed a law to rename the day “Allegiance Day,” and it became a holiday in the country.

This was, in part, to give Armenians a sense of pride and recognition.

“I think that’s what they wanted,” said Armenians in Israel.

This year, in what Armenians call “Almandia Day,” they’ll be celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, and they hope that this year’s celebration will also reflect the memory of those who were murdered in that genocide. “

But they did not want us to celebrate, they wanted us to remember the Armenians and their suffering.”

This year, in what Armenians call “Almandia Day,” they’ll be celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, and they hope that this year’s celebration will also reflect the memory of those who were murdered in that genocide.

“We want to celebrate the 100 years of suffering of our people in our country and in Armenia, and we also want to honor those who are still alive today, and also remember the Armenian genocide,” said Armenian President Serzh Sarkisian.

“The only way to do that is to commemorate the Armenian independence day and to celebrate it.”