Independence Day Featured Why Brazil’s Congo independence Day is a huge opportunity for footballers

Why Brazil’s Congo independence Day is a huge opportunity for footballers

Brazil’s president is taking the first steps to end the country’s political and economic isolation as his country prepares for its biggest football match since the 1992 World Cup.

The Confederations Cup in Russia this summer will mark the 100th anniversary of the countrys independence from Britain.

In his weekly address to Congress on Monday, Dilma Rousseff said Brazil would be an “independent, peaceful and democratic country in the future”.

Her government is expected to announce a new constitution this week.

But in her address, she was cautious about calling the independence day a “national day”.

“We will continue to support the struggle of the Brazilian people,” Rousseff told lawmakers.

“The independence day is not an event, it is a time for celebrating Brazil, our history and our people’s determination.”

She did not give any specific dates for the celebrations.

But the independence days were celebrated in Brazil before the end of World War II.

They are usually celebrated in October, when Brazil celebrates the centenary of its independence from Spain.

A few days later, in November, a small group of football fans will gather at a nearby football stadium to hold a “Confederations Cup”.

The fans will celebrate the country, and they will also play a game to decide who wins.